Audio Note Jinro Integrated Amplifier

About Audio Note Amplifier

Audio Note manufacture a complete range of valve amplifiers. Though their name may be synonymous with the likes of the Onkagu, they start from very reasonable prices. An Integrated OTO starts from £1,900, an M-Zero Pre-amp from £1,050 and a Vindicator Power- Amp from £2,400.
Audio Note is one company that has never needed to cloud its philosophy in marketing double-talk. Their premise has always been rather simple — directly heated triodes in single-ended mode with no global feedback. They feel, and much of the audio industry agrees, that transistor based amplifiers are fundamentally flawed because they are a semi-conductor yet live music is a linear sonic event.
Simplicity is at the heart of every Audio Note amplifier. They pay homage to the idea that every component exerts an influence on the sound, so they must each be of the very best possible quality. It is a powerful concept achieved through visionary engineering, extensive research and development.
Refinement is the central theme to every Audio Note Amplifier. They do not believe in applying bigger, louder or more complex solutions to their products. Instead they seek to establish greater value through better sound. They look for solutions in technology, techniques, parts, materials and amplifying devices that can be shown to provide better low level behaviour, as they believe these are the most important aspects.

About Audio Note Jinro

 

The Audio Note Ongaku has long been the product to beat among people who prize the immediacy, palpability, and musicality of the finest single-ended triode (SET) amplifiers.
The Audio Note Jinro is part of that unique family. A brother, if you like, employing the same circuit, implemented with humbler parts.
The Audio Note Jinro is completely handmade. The bespoke power-supply choke and drive-stage transformers are labours of love—the sorts of thing one sees less and less these days,
Everything in the Jinro is hand-wired, point to point. Parts are fastened to the chassis rigidly and ruggedly, and while there exist some separate boards for certain parts, they aren’t PCBs.
I loved the Audio Note Jinro. Its overall sound is very subtly sweet, with a midrange that is a bit soft—timbrally, but not temporally—with an abundance of that often-noted-yet-never-explained “SET sound” that allows solo voices and instruments to stand musically and spatially proud of the rest of the mix. The Jinro played melodies with unsurpassed flow and momentum. In conjunction with the  DAC 4.1 Balanced and AN-E Spe HE, it sounds wonderful with depth and air, putting a natural finish on notes that is strikingly real.
Available in one Version.
Audio Note Jinro Integrated Amplifier. 20 watt SET integrated amplifier with Chinese 211 tubes.

 

Audio Note Jinro Reviews

 

 

‘During its time in my home, the Audio Note Jinro behaved flawlessly: no hum, no crackle noises, no service interruptions. And the curtains never once caught on fire.

Listening
I loved the Audio Note Jinro. Its overall sound was very subtly sweet, with a midrange that was a bit soft—timbrally, but not temporally—with an abundance of that often-noted-yet-never-explained “SET sound” that allows solo voices and instruments to stand musically and spatially proud of the rest of the mix. The Jinro played melodies with unsurpassed flow and momentum, including those in Elgar’s Sospiri, recorded by Paul Goodwin and the English Chamber Orchestra (AIFF file ripped from CD, Harmonia Mundi HMU 907258), and allowed even the most up-tempo music—the Replacements’ Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash (LP, Twin Tone TTR 8123) comes to mind—to sound nearly as propulsive as through, say, a Naim Nait. Yet the Jinro distinguished itself by allowing notes a realistically generous amount of natural decay—again, without the slightest sense of rhythmic lagging.

To some observers, I suppose one or another of those qualities is attributable to one or another departure from perfectly flat frequency response: a point of view to which anyone is entitled, wrong though it seems to me. That said, it struck me that the Jinro worked with my Audio Note AN-Es to produce the most timbrally realistic performance I’ve heard from those speakers. The brass instruments in Sir Adrian Boult and the London Symphony Orchestra’s great-sounding recording of Vaughan Williams’s Job (LP, EMI ASD 2673) sounded just plain right; and in the recording by Nicole Henriot-Schweitzer, Charles Munch, and the Boston Symphony Orchestra of Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G (LP, RCA Living Stereo/Classic LSC-2271), the piano had all the sparkle and purr one could hope for, without the thinness or the downright mechanical quality with which lesser gear imbue it—especially in the second-movement waltz. Similarly, the opening brass and the energetically bowed cellos in Holst’s A Fugal Overture, performed by Sir Adrian Boult and the London Philharmonic Orchestra (LP, Lyrita SRCS 37), were gutsy and richly textured through the Jinro–AN-E combination, but not overly so.’ Reviewed by Art Dudley at Stereophile.

To read the full review of the Jingo Amplifier by stereophile, click here